Museum Utopie und Alltag

De

Location Eisenhüttenstadt

Erich-Weinert-Allee 3
15890 Eisenhüttenstadt

Opening hours

Tuesday to Sunday, national holidays
11.00 – 17.00

If the national holiday is on a Monday, the museum is open. Closed on Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year, even on Mondays.
The exhibitions are barrier-free. An elevator and a barrier-free toilet are available.

Entrance

Adults: € 4
Concessions: € 2*

Groups: € 40**
Guided tours: € 30 / 50 ***
Schulprojekte:  €15 plus 1 € p. P

*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons, Seniors; Children aged under 7: free
** up to 20 people
*** Tue-Fr: € 30 € / Sa-So: € 50

Location Beeskow

Spreeinsel
Access via Burg Beeskow
Frankfurter Strasse 23
15848 Beeskow

Guided tours Art Archive:

The Archive in Beeskow can be visited on guided tours. Please see our programme for details. In addition to public guided tours during the current event programme, it is also possible to book special tours.
Please contact us in advance at: +49 (0)3366 – 352727

Entrance

Per person: € 9
Concessions: € 7*

Special guided tours:
€ 26 per group, plus entrance per person
*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons
** up to 20 people

Social Media

Museum Utopie und Alltag

Tel: 03364 – 417 355
Fax: 03364 – 418 947
museum@utopieundalltag.de

Postal and invoice adress:
Landkreis Oder-Spree
Kunstarchiv / DOK
Breitscheidstr. 7
15848 Beeskow

Newsletter2Go

Borders of Friendship
Tourism between GDR, CSSR and Poland
26.06.2022—30.04.2023
ČSSR, Malá Fatra-Gebirge 1974. Photo: Werner Großmann (Bundesarchiv Bild 183-P0215-419)

Follow us

News

U5, KARO, Kette und Ring, 2014

Address:
Ausstellungspavillon des Brandenburgischen Kunstvereins Potsdam e. V
Freundschaftsinsel Potsdam
Hermann-Elflein-Straße 18
14467 Potsdam

 

I love Clark

Opening: 26 January 2023, starting 6 pm
Curated by Helene Romakin and Lea Schleiffenbaum
The exhibition is supported by the Landeshauptstadt Potsdam, das Museum für Utopie und Alltag, Beeskow und Eisenhüttenstadt, and ProHelvetia.

Learn more

 

Two cultures collided in 1989: daily life in the East and daily life in the West, in the various materials and forms that shaped their distinct lives. Today, if you look back, you may still detect overlaps, especially in the design of commonplace items like typewriters, kitchen mixers, and razors. While the Western world was predominately positioned above the Eastern world, the memory of the objects persisted there. The Dokumentationszentrum Alltagskultur der DDR (Documentation Center for Everyday Culture of the GDR ) in Eisenhüttenstadt, which is now the Museum für Utopie und Alltag (Museum for Utopia and Everyday Life), started collecting these objects with the help of citizens shortly after the fall of the Wall.

The artists’ collective U5 looked through the extensive collection at the invitation of curators Helene Romakin and Lea Schleiffenbaum. The purpose was to enable access through the morphology of things and products rather than to remeasure present history. In contrast to its utilitarian characteristics, morphology is more interested in the shape of an object (or work of art). What draws people to view or use the object? What connotations does it have? U5 combines their own miniatures, sculptures, ceramics, and non-German everyday items with items from the Documentation Center for Everyday Culture of the GDR in this exhibition. In doing so, they strip the GDR artifacts of their historical context. A recent video piece furthermore highlights the various narrative levels of the artifacts and shows their backgrounds. The show explores how old conversations can be reinterpreted, which stories are remembered and lost, and what more is left of youth’s yearnings than perfume, dripping candles, eggnog, and ozone records.

 

With I love Clark, U5 takes listeners through associations and recollections, where the superimposition of realities and presences allows for fresh interpretations and connections. Through a find of slides titled “Pictures from Antarctica” from the former German Central Institute for Teaching Materials Berlin in the collection holdings, U5 unfolded a possible approach via the Georg-Forster Antarctic Research Station established by the GDR in 1976. After the Berlin Wall fell between the political systems, the station, located 15,000 kilometers from home, persisted for several years. It did so by surviving the state in which it was created. Behind it are the scientific ozone measurements from the GDR that are well-regarded. Another story ran concurrently, detailing how female researchers traveled from the FRG to the distant Georg-von-Neumayer-Station.

The exhibition is supported by the Landeshauptstadt Potsdam, das Museum für Utopie und Alltag, Beeskow und Eisenhüttenstadt, and ProHelvetia. We also sincerely thank Gabriele Fritzsche of Casino Perfume Saxonia.

The exhibition is supported by the Landeshauptstadt Potsdam, das Museum für Utopie und Alltag, Beeskow und Eisenhüttenstadt, and ProHelvetia. We also sincerely thank Gabriele Fritzsche of Casino Perfume Saxonia.

Close
Ausschnitt: Erika Stürmer-Alex, o. T., 1980/81, Rüdersdorf, Foto: Martin Maleschka,
Ausschnitt: Erika Stürmer-Alex, o. T., 1980/81, Rüdersdorf, Foto: Martin Maleschka,
Close
Close

Address:
Landtag Brandenburg
Alter Markt 1
14467 Potsdam

 

Opening: 25 January 2023, starting 12 pm

Learn more

 

Das Museum Utopie und Alltag zeigt gemeinsam mit dem Fotografen und Autoren Martin Maleschka und dem Brandenburgischen Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologischen Landesmuseum, wie kunstreich Brandenburg ist und thematisiert zugleich die Aufgaben, die mit diesem Erbe verknüpft sind.

Die Ausstellung kann vom 26. Januar bis zum 8. Dezember 2023, montags bis freitags von 8:00 bis 18:00 Uhr, im Landtag besucht werden. An gesetzlichen Feiertagen bleibt sie geschlossen.

Close
ČSSR, Malá Fatra-Gebirge 1974. Foto: Werner Großmann (Bundesarchiv Bild 183-P0215-419)

During the Cold War, an “Iron Curtain” ran through Europe, but even the borders between “friendly Socialist countries” were politically sensitive and only allowed limited international movement. In the 1960s, rules became more relaxed, but a true breakthrough came in 1972: the GDR, ČSSR and Poland introduced laws permitting cross-border travel without a passport or visa. In the very first year of their introduction, millions of people took advantage of the new regulations, going on holidays, day trips and shopping tours to neighbouring countries.

The exhibition highlights these diverse travel experiences, going beyond the “Borders of Friendship”. It presents material evidence of tourism from the collection of the Museum of Utopia and Daily Life, other collections and archives, as well as private loans: including travel catalogues, posters, maps, holiday souvenirs, postcards, photo albums and 35 mm films.

Temporary Exhibition

Preview
ČSSR, Malá Fatra-Gebirge 1974. Foto: Werner Großmann (Bundesarchiv Bild 183-P0215-419)

During the Cold War, an “Iron Curtain” ran through Europe, but even the borders between “friendly Socialist countries” were politically sensitive and only allowed limited international movement. In the 1960s, rules became more relaxed, but a true breakthrough came in 1972: the GDR, ČSSR and Poland introduced laws permitting cross-border travel without a passport or visa. In the very first year of their introduction, millions of people took advantage of the new regulations, going on holidays, day trips and shopping tours to neighbouring countries.

The exhibition highlights these diverse travel experiences, going beyond the “Borders of Friendship”. It presents material evidence of tourism from the collection of the Museum of Utopia and Daily Life, other collections and archives, as well as private loans: including travel catalogues, posters, maps, holiday souvenirs, postcards, photo albums and 35 mm films.

Preview

Events

On Tour