Museum Utopie und Alltag

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Location Eisenhüttenstadt

Erich-Weinert-Allee 3
15890 Eisenhüttenstadt

Opening hours

Tuesday to Sunday, national holidays
11.00 – 17.00

If the national holiday is on a Monday, the museum is open. Closed on Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year, even on Mondays.
The exhibitions are barrier-free. An elevator and a barrier-free toilet are available.

Entrance

Adults: € 4
Concessions: € 2*

Groups: € 40**
Guided tours: € 30 / 50 ***
Schulprojekte:  €15 plus 1 € p. P

*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons, Seniors; Children aged under 7: free
** up to 20 people
*** Tue-Fr: € 30 € / Sa-So: € 50

Location Beeskow

Spreeinsel
Access via Burg Beeskow
Frankfurter Strasse 23
15848 Beeskow

Guided tours Art Archive:

The Archive in Beeskow can be visited on guided tours. Please see our programme for details. In addition to public guided tours during the current event programme, it is also possible to book special tours.
Please contact us in advance at: +49 (0)3366 – 352727

Entrance

Per person: € 9
Concessions: € 7*

Special guided tours:
€ 26 per group, plus entrance per person
*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons
** up to 20 people

Social Media

Museum Utopie und Alltag

Tel: 03364 – 417355
Fax: 03364 – 418947
museum@utopieundalltag.de

Postal and invoice adress:
Landkreis Oder-Spree
Kunstarchiv / DOK
Breitscheidstr. 7
15848 Beeskow

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The Museum of Utopia and Daily Life unites the Documentation Centre of Everyday Culture of the GDR and the Beeskow Art Archive.

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Eisenhüttenstadt im Wandel, Fotomontage von Martin Maleschka, (c) Fotograf.
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04.07.2021 – 29.05.2022

 

The upheaval of 1989/90 led to a watershed in urban development throughout Eastern Germany, especially for industrial cities in peripheral locations. Industrial and commercial closure, migration and declining birth rates are causing shrinking cities, demolition and urban transformation. How will these cities cope in the years ahead?

 

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Thomas Kläber, o. T. („Erlebnis Trasse“), 1984, ©Th. Kläber

06.06. – 03.10.2021

 

The current construction of the Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline in the Baltic Sea is a controversial geopolitical topic. The struggle for dominance on the European energy market has been continuing for decades. From the 1970s to 1990s, participation in the Drushba Pipeline (Russian: Дружба; English: Friendship) was an exemplary project with which the German Democratic Republic (GDR) presented itself abroad. For years, thousands of workers were deployed along the pipeline, for which the GDR received natural gas from the Soviet Union. 4931

 

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All visitors need to book a timed slot in advance: 03364 417355 or museum@utopieundalltag.de.

 

Visitors aged 7 years and over are required to wear an FFP2 face mask or medical mask in all indoor areas of the museums. Museum Utopie und Alltag is obliged to document all visits to the museums. Contact details are recorded at the entrances. We ask that you keep a safe distance apart during your visit. Please be considerate of other visitors and staff.

Temporary Exhibition

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Thomas Kläber, o. T. („Erlebnis Trasse“), 1984, ©Th. Kläber

The current construction of the Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline in the Baltic Sea is a controversial geopolitical topic. The struggle for dominance on the European energy market has been continuing for decades. From the 1970s to 1990s, participation in the Drushba Pipeline (Russian: Дружба; English: Friendship) was an exemplary project with which the German Democratic Republic (GDR) presented itself abroad. For years, thousands of workers were deployed along the pipeline, for which the GDR received natural gas from the Soviet Union.

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The “project of the century” was accompanied by a major cultural campaign: the GDR brought artists to the pipeline to entertain the “Trasniks”, as the workers were known; artworks were also produced on-site, which were presented at touring exhibitions along the pipeline and in the GDR. The infrastructure project was also showcased in publications and numerous television reports. This exhibition focuses on the connection between culture and economic policy, investigating the image that was constructed for the general public and the role that art played in the process.

Exhibition venue: ehem. Selbstbedienungskaufhalle, Saarlouiser Straße 60a, Eisenhüttenstadt

The project is part of the theme year Kulturland Brandenburg 2021: “The future of the Past – Industrial culture in motion”

The theme year Kulturland Brandenburg 2021 is funded by the Ministry for Science, Research and Culture, as well as the Ministry for Infrastructure and State Planning of the State of Brandenburg.

Mit freundlicher Unterstützung der brandenburgischen Sparkassen.

Mit freundlicher Unterstützung der Investitionsbank des Landes Brandenburg.

Special thanks to Holger Friedrich for kindly providing the project space for the exhibition.

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Blick in die Ausstellung „Zeitumstellung“ mit Werken von Claudia Borchers, Wolfgang Eckhardt und Maria Mateva, Foto: Birgitta Schmidt
Blick in die Ausstellung „Zeitumstellung“ mit Werken von Claudia Borchers, Wolfgang Eckhardt und Maria Mateva, Foto: Birgitta Schmidt
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Blick in die Ausstellung „Zeitumstellung“ mit einem Werk von Annett Zinsmeister, Foto: Birgitta Schmidt
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Blick in die Ausstellung „Zeitumstellung“ mit Werken Albrecht Gehse, Max Görner, Gerd Gombert, Bruno Griesel , Michael Hegewald, Frenzy Höhne, Achim Kircher, Konrad Knebel und Barbara Müller-Kageler, Foto: Birgitta Schmidt
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Blick in die Ausstellung „Zeitumstellung“ mit Werken von Inken Reinert und Thomas Ziegler, Foto: Kunstarchiv Beeskow
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Blick in die Ausstellung „Zeitumstellung“ mit Werken von Konrad Knebel und Barbara Müller-Kageler, Foto: Birgitta Schmidt
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Exhibition at Schloss Biesdorf, Berlin

 

Due to the current restrictions on public life to combat the Corona pandemic, Schloss Biesdorf is closed. Information: schlossbiesdorf.de/en/.

 

Zeitumstellung | Time Change

 

Works from the Beeskow Art Archive in dialogue with contemporary positions

 

The memory of the GDR as a country of one’s own origins and part of today’s Federal Republic is the focus of the exhibition “Zeitumstellung”. Recent socio-political developments make it clear how diverse and heterogeneous the memories of this supposedly “disappeared” country are. The interplay of selected works from the Beeskow collection with contemporary positions in this exhibition enables new dialogues, perspectives and questions. Works from the art archive will open up new perspectives on the GDR with current works by contemporary artists and expand the view beyond the historically conditioned borders. The exhibition looks back at life in the GDR and its representations, not Eastalgia, but remembrance and mediation into today.

 

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The Beeskow Art Archive houses a special stock of artistic works from 40 years of the GDR that is of cultural and art historical interest. Owned by parties, mass organisations and state institutions of the GDR before 1990, the works have belonged to the new federal states since German reunification. The Beeskow depot holds the shares of the states of Berlin, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. The exhibition “Zeitumstellung” is part of a reorientation whose aim is, among other things, to open up the collection even more to new perspectives through a contemporary approach.

Schloss Biesdorf, as the municipal gallery of the district of Marzahn-Hellersdorf, has already worked together with the Beeskow Art Archive in recent years. Smaller presentations from the context there and also selected positioning of individual works in the current contemporary context have been shown several times.

In this exhibition, the focus is now on works from Beeskow.

In dialogue with contemporary works, this exhibition can offer a further contribution to the discussion about the artistic heritage of the GDR. he exhibition will be accompanied by an educational programme.

Artists in the exhibition:
Joachim Bayer, Claudia Borchers, Gudrun Brüne, Manfred Butzmann, Fritz Duda, Wolfgang Eckhardt, Bernhard Franke, Friedrich-Wilhelm Fretwurst, Peter Fritz, Ellen Fuhr, Gerhard Füsser, Dieter Gantz, Albrecht Gehse, Gerd Gombert, Max Görner, Bruno Griesel, Claas Gutsche, Ruthild Hahne, Monika Hamann, Harald Hauswald, Michael Hegewald, Hermann Hensel, Eberhard Hertwig, Christa und Günter Hoffmann, Martin Hoffmann/Reinhard Zabka, Frenzy Höhne, Jo Jastram, Doris Kahane, Susanne Kandt-Horn, Doris Karras, Achim Kircher, Konrad Knebel, Kurt-Hermann Kühn, Rolf Lindemann, Harry Lüttger, Maria Mateva, Harald Metzkes, Ingeborg Michaelis, Paul Michaelis, Rainer Muhrbeck, Barbara Müller-Kageler, Gudrun Petersdorff, Mario Pfeifer, Carla Pohl, Volker Pohlenz, Inken Reinert, Lothar Rericha, Gottfried Richter, Horst Ring, Gerhard Rommel, Gerti Schlegel, Rolf Xago Schröder, Werner Schulz, Maria  Sewcz, Hartmut Staake, Daniel Theiler, Hans Ticha, Andreas Wachter, Norbert Wagenbrett, Malte Wandel, Christoph Wetzel, Walter Womacka, Axel Wunsch, Thomas Ziegler, Annett Zinsmeister, Christof Zwiener

Curated by Elke Neumann

A cooperation project between Schloss Biesdorf and the Kunstarchiv Beeskow.

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Preview

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Eisenhüttenstadt im Wandel, Fotomontage von Martin Maleschka, (c) Fotograf.
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Schwedt (Oder)
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The upheaval of 1989/90 led to a watershed in urban development throughout Eastern Germany, especially for industrial cities in peripheral locations. Industrial and commercial closure, migration and declining birth rates are causing shrinking cities, demolition and urban transformation. How will these cities cope in the years ahead? Can history reveal specific opportunities for the future? The Museum of Utopia and Daily Life invites visitors, residents and experts to jointly consider these questions and develop ideas.

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Eisenhüttenstadt is an especially suitable example: planned as a “new type of city”, the first housing blocks of the socialist model city were developed here 70 years ago. The exhibition takes comparative perspectives on Nowa Huta in Poland and Schwedt in Brandenburg: how are these cities shaping social transformation? The exhibition also presents plans, models and photographs, as well as the artistic installation “DDR NOIR” by the artist Henrike Naumann.

The exhibition project “Endless Beginning. The transformation of the socialist city” is supported by the Federal Foundation for the Study of the Communist Dictatorship in Eastern Germany and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Visual Communication at the weißensee academy of art berlin. Also in cooperation with the City of Eisenhüttenstadt and the Städtisches Museum Eisenhüttenstadt, City Archive Department. Media partner: Das Magazin.

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Events

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On Tour

Foto: MOUSSE PUBLISHING
Foto: MOUSSE PUBLISHING
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Urlaubs- und Freizeitszenen am Springsee in Brandenburg, August 1952, privates Fotoalbum, Bestand Dokumentationszentrum Alltagskultur der DDR. Reproduktion: Armin Herrmann.
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COLD REVOLUTION. CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN SOCIETIES IN TIMES OF SOCIALIST REALISM, 1948–1959“

 

The Museum of Utopia and Daily Life proudly supports the Exhibition “Cold Revolutions“ in the Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw planned for

 

Mai.- 19.September 2021

 

Cold Revolution. Central and Eastern European Societies in Times of Socialist Realism, 1948–1959 is the outcome of an international conference organized by the Zachęta – National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, in January 2020, and an exhibition project (planned for May 25 – September 19, 2021). Both the conference and the show deal with Socialist Realism, a sensitive and problematic period in contemporary art history. The publication inquires about the relationship between the visual culture of the 1950s and the radical social revolution that took place in Central and Eastern Europe in the ‘cold’ climate of growing international tensions and the strengthening of communist dictatorships. Covering and linking together a wide range of areas of study—art history, but also social, political, and cultural history—thirty contributors explore deeply the 1950s’ social transformations, presenting intersectional essays on cultural and art history, short key study texts and profound analysis examples from the fields of painting, architecture and urban planning, design, photography, film and graphic design, representative of different countries, such as Poland, GDR, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, and Hungary.