Museum Utopie und Alltag

De

Location Eisenhüttenstadt

Erich-Weinert-Allee 3
15890 Eisenhüttenstadt

Opening hours

Tuesday to Sunday, national holidays
11.00 – 17.00

If the national holiday is on a Monday, the museum is open. Closed on Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year, even on Mondays.
The exhibitions are barrier-free. An elevator and a barrier-free toilet are available.

Entrance

Adults: € 4
Concessions: € 2*

Groups: € 40**
Guided tours: € 30 / 50 ***
Schulprojekte:  €15 plus 1 € p. P

*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons, Seniors; Children aged under 7: free
** up to 20 people
*** Tue-Fr: € 30 € / Sa-So: € 50

Location Beeskow

Spreeinsel
Access via Burg Beeskow
Frankfurter Strasse 23
15848 Beeskow

Guided tours Art Archive:

The Archive in Beeskow can be visited on guided tours. Please see our programme for details. In addition to public guided tours during the current event programme, it is also possible to book special tours.
Please contact us in advance at: +49 (0)3366 – 352727

Entrance

Per person: € 9
Concessions: € 7*

Special guided tours:
€ 26 per group, plus entrance per person
*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons
** up to 20 people

Social Media

Museum Utopie und Alltag

Tel: 03364 – 417 355
Fax: 03364 – 418 947
museum@utopieundalltag.de

Postal and invoice adress:
Landkreis Oder-Spree
Kunstarchiv / DOK
Breitscheidstr. 7
15848 Beeskow

Newsletter2Go

Borders of Friendship
Tourism between GDR, CSSR and Poland
26.06.2022—30.04.2023
ČSSR, Malá Fatra-Gebirge 1974. Photo: Werner Großmann (Bundesarchiv Bild 183-P0215-419)

Follow us

News

ČSSR, Malá Fatra-Gebirge 1974. Foto: Werner Großmann (Bundesarchiv Bild 183-P0215-419)

During the Cold War, an “Iron Curtain” ran through Europe, but even the borders between “friendly Socialist countries” were politically sensitive and only allowed limited international movement. In the 1960s, rules became more relaxed, but a true breakthrough came in 1972: the GDR, ČSSR and Poland introduced laws permitting cross-border travel without a passport or visa. In the very first year of their introduction, millions of people took advantage of the new regulations, going on holidays, day trips and shopping tours to neighbouring countries.

The exhibition highlights these diverse travel experiences, going beyond the “Borders of Friendship”. It presents material evidence of tourism from the collection of the Museum of Utopia and Daily Life, other collections and archives, as well as private loans: including travel catalogues, posters, maps, holiday souvenirs, postcards, photo albums and 35 mm films.

Temporary Exhibition

Preview
ČSSR, Malá Fatra-Gebirge 1974. Foto: Werner Großmann (Bundesarchiv Bild 183-P0215-419)

During the Cold War, an “Iron Curtain” ran through Europe, but even the borders between “friendly Socialist countries” were politically sensitive and only allowed limited international movement. In the 1960s, rules became more relaxed, but a true breakthrough came in 1972: the GDR, ČSSR and Poland introduced laws permitting cross-border travel without a passport or visa. In the very first year of their introduction, millions of people took advantage of the new regulations, going on holidays, day trips and shopping tours to neighbouring countries.

The exhibition highlights these diverse travel experiences, going beyond the “Borders of Friendship”. It presents material evidence of tourism from the collection of the Museum of Utopia and Daily Life, other collections and archives, as well as private loans: including travel catalogues, posters, maps, holiday souvenirs, postcards, photo albums and 35 mm films.

Preview

Events

On Tour