Museum Utopie und Alltag

De

Location Eisenhüttenstadt

Erich-Weinert-Allee 3
15890 Eisenhüttenstadt

Opening hours

Tuesday to Sunday, national holidays
11.00 – 17.00

If the national holiday is on a Monday, the museum is open. Closed on Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year, even on Mondays.
The exhibitions are barrier-free. An elevator and a barrier-free toilet are available.

Entrance

Adults: € 4
Concessions: € 2*

Groups: € 40**
Guided tours: € 30 / 50 ***
Schulprojekte:  €15 plus 1 € p. P

*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons, Seniors; Children aged under 7: free
** up to 20 people
*** up to 12 people
Tue-Fr: € 30 € / Sa-So: € 50

Location Beeskow

Spreeinsel
Access via Burg Beeskow
Frankfurter Strasse 23
15848 Beeskow

Guided tours Art Archive:

The Archive in Beeskow can be visited on guided tours. Please see our programme for details. In addition to public guided tours during the current event programme, it is also possible to book special tours.
Please contact us in advance at: +49 (0)3366 – 352727

Entrance

Per person: € 9
Concessions: € 7*

Special guided tours:
€ 26 per group, plus entrance per person
*Pupils, Students, disabled  persons
** up to 20 people

Social Media

Museum Utopie und Alltag

Tel: 03364 – 417 355
Fax: 03364 – 418 947
museum@utopieundalltag.de

Postal and invoice adress:
Landkreis Oder-Spree
Kunstarchiv / DOK
Breitscheidstr. 7
15848 Beeskow

Press

Contact Press:

Sabrina Kotzian
E-Mail: sabrina.kotzian@l-os.de
Phone: 03366 – 35 2736

Press releases

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Virtuelle Sonderausstellung

Gerhard Kurt Müller (1926-2019), Flüchtlinge (1987), Öl auf Leinwand, Herkunft: Freier Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund, Bezirksvorstand Berlin, Eigentum des Landes Berlin / Bestand Kunstarchiv Beeskow, © Gerhard-Kurt-Müller-Stiftung.
Gerhard Kurt Müller (1926-2019), Flüchtlinge (1987), Öl auf Leinwand, Herkunft: Freier Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund, Bezirksvorstand Berlin, Eigentum des Landes Berlin / Bestand Kunstarchiv Beeskow, © Gerhard-Kurt-Müller-Stiftung.
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Dieter Gantz, Hommage à Carl Hofer, 1985/1987, © Erbengemeinschaft Dieter Gantz.
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The violence and destruction of World War II remained tangible for decades after it ended and involved traumatic experiences for the generations that took part in it. Its onerous heritage was partially suppressed in the period of reconstruction from 1945 onwards, or dealt with in accounts either within families or in cultural memory. For instance in the GDR, it was impossible to publicly address the theme of flight and expulsion from former German territories in the East. The painting “Refugees” (“Flüchtlinge”) by Gerhard Kurt Müller, which is presented in this room, does not explicitly break that taboo, but it is open to such references.